More DW Blogs DW.COM

Education for all

Five bloggers, five countries, one dialogue

Search Results for Tag: Government

Teachers: taking action at the root

Teachers protesting in front of government offices in Buenos Aires

In March this year, there was a huge strike from the teachers’ union in which they demanded a salary raise. Every year, the timing works out almost identically: the academic year in Argentina starts in March, and some three weeks to a month before that, negotiations with the union take place. There was the threat that classes would not actually start because no agreement had been reached. Teachers in Argentina have some of the lowest wages in society, so it’s very common that they have to overwork themselves to make a decent living.

Date

June 19, 2012 | 12:45 pm

Share

Feedback

4 Comments

Does less knowledge mean more comfort?

Mobile phones - literacy not required...

The recent history of education in Iraq is full of ups and downs, and illiteracy, especially for women, remains a problem.

I’d like to imagine seeing life and the world like through the eyes of an uneducated person. But I think this is much harder than imagining it through a genius’ eyes. I know so many uneducated people – the only thing they can read and understand is the clock. I wonder how they can use mobile phones…? They can use their contacts to dial, and they seem to know who is calling them! Maybe after lots of mistakes, they just figure out how to use their phones. In fact, it could even be a kind of adventure for them!

Date

June 15, 2012 | 6:45 am

Share

Feedback

1 Comment

Throwing a bit of a wrench into gender discussions

Equal rights for girls - and boys!

We often make the mistake of equating the definition of gender with women. ‘Gender equality,’ ‘gender and education,’ ‘gender and…’ almost always mean women and fighting for the rights of women. From the higher authorities such as the UN to the basic family level, war has been waged almost literally to protect the rights of the female gender – and rightfully so. I am certain that the strides that have been made even in the western world with regards to the emancipation of women would not have been possible had there been no sacrifices made before.

Nevertheless, I tend to think that male children have been forgotten!

Date

May 23, 2012 | 9:12 am

Share

Feedback

1 Comment

Strokes of luck

 

Each year, students at the Ranya Institute's festival show off what they can do

I graduated from the Music Department at the Ranya Institute of Fine Arts in June 2008. Of course, I was happy to be done and excited because I thought that I had a job lined up for right afterward. I did everything necessary and met the requirements for a position teaching in a primary school. But it turned out that we recent graduates were unlucky – and not just in my field. No one was finding jobs in Iraq.

Date

May 11, 2012 | 3:30 pm

Share

Feedback

Write a Comment

A wounded society

During periods of corruption, many turn their backs on education

I read Hellgurd’s entry, and many things sound familiar.

Hellgurd implies in his entry that education in his country hasn’t been developed to its fullest due to a lack of continuity in policy. I believe it could also have something to do with the set of values that is chosen by the ruling party. There is also the fact that a lot of people in positions of power see education as a threat.

Date

May 11, 2012 | 7:40 am

Share

Feedback

1 Comment

Hope springs eternal

Proud to be shaping the future of Iraq

In my country, it should really be the case that the education process reflects individual perspectives as well as developments throughout the world. However, we have a lot of problems there. Until recently, Iraq’s dictatorial government, like all the other parts of life here in Iraq, were big obstacles to education. Schools were prevented from developing and kept circling around a limited range of ideas.

Date

May 4, 2012 | 10:50 am

Share

Feedback

5 Comments