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The 77 percent goes on the road to support African youth

At a recent town hall debate in  Mamou, a small city in central Guinea, DW’s project supporting African youth, The 77 percent, brought together around 600 people to discuss young people’s challenges and dreams for the future.

Conducted by the Guinean minister of youth, Mouctar Diallo along with DW journalists, the debate focused on preventing young people from joining the wave of migration leaving Sub-Saharan Africa. In a speech, Diallo appealed to parents not to give their children money so that they can leave the country

The work done by local media in cooperation with DW conveys an important message to young Africans that leaving home is not the only solution for the future. Dialogue, communication and sharing ideas can give young people hope that they are not alone in dealing with challenges.

The DW project, The 77 percent, focuses on a new generation of Africans, 77 percent of whom are under the age of 35. With web-videos, online projects and direct reporting from different regions in Africa, DW is trying to paint a picture of what life is like for African youth. In identifying the problems that many people share, solutions can become clearer.

Since 2016, DW, in cooperation with local media partners, has visited many communities in Sub-Saharan Africa to address the problem of mass-migration and listen to reasons why young Africans are leaving home.

The town hall debate in Mamou was conducted in cooperation with the German foreign ministry  and Radio Bolivar FM, and was one of the most successful events to date. More 77 percent debates are planned soon for Mali and Nigeria.

Date

2018-07-20 | 8:41

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Market roundup: July 2018

Africa

Eco@Afrique, the French-language edition of DW’s popular environmental conservation show is expanding its presence in Africa with new broadcasting partnerships in countries including Mali and Burkina Faso.

On the radio, DW’s educational radio soap opera Crime Fighters has been picked up by new broadcasting partners in Burkina Faso, the Ivory Coast and Mali. And in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, one of the country’s largest stations, Top Congo FM, will soon be broadcasting one hour of DW’s French radio programming and two hours in Swahili, along with DW’s Bundesliga coverage.

Asia

IDX Channel is Indonesia’s largest bilingual markets and finance channel. They recently acquired the DW English-language magazines Arts21, CheckIn and Made in Germany. IDX Channel reaches a combined audience of 20 million on satellite, IPTV and online.

Charoen Cable TV Network in Thailand will soon include DW’s flagship English channel in its basic programming package. The cable network reaches 600,000 households.

Cambodia’s only English-language news website, Khmer Times, has started including English-language DW news and feature articles.

Latin America

A new cooperation with DW partners in Mexico is focused on enhancing cultural content from Europe for local audiences. Every Monday, a culture expert in Berlin is appearing in live segments broadcast on the Mexican public broadcaster, Canal 22 and the private broadcaster El Financiero.

Date

2018-07-19 | 10:24

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DW shares the powerful story of Islamic State survivors

In the barren region around Mount Sinjar mountain in the north of Iraq, two DW reporters were able to capture the harrowing story of a Yazidi woman who survived two years in the captivity of the so-called Islamic State (IS).

Opressed, Enslaved, Forgotten: Yazidi’s of Northern Iraq, brings viewers to a remote place with an intimate piece of reporting that captures how the suffering of one individual symbolizes the larger impact of genocide.

The DW reporters visited the Yazidi woman and the remainder her family at the Sar-Dashte refugee camp on the plateau of Mount Sinjar and recorded their story of survival. Describing the family’s personal tragedy along with an intimate portrayal of their everyday lives and their perspective for the future provides viewers a unique experience.

“We are making a forgotten story visible again,” said DW journalist Sandra Petersmann. “On every platform we need to captivate our audience with emotion and information.”

Although the world knows about the atrocities committed by IS, in-depth storytelling delivers a perspective that has an emotional effect on viewers.

The report is a great example of the work DW’s journalists perform to share stories of forgotten people with the entire world. It will be broadcast in all four DW languages and can be seen in the DW Media Center.

Date

2018-06-26 | 8:30

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Four things you may have missed at the 2018 DW Global Media Forum

The 2018 Global Media Forum wrapped up last week with over 2,500 guests from all over the world gathering in Bonn for three days of learning and networking. You probably caught the keynote speeches, and the DW Freedom of Speech Award , but here are four events at the 2018 Global Media Forum you may have missed.

1. Peace With the Taliban: A Compromise on Human Rights?

On Tuesday, former Afghan President Ahmed Karzai was joined by DW journalists and the German envoy to Afghanistan to discuss the potential for peace with the Taliban in a country beset by continuous conflict. The discussion provided first-person insight into a complicated and unstable region from someone who has played an integral part in its politics.

2. Reporting terror: Who sees what, when and why?

Four journalists with experience in reporting from crisis regions around the world gathered for a panel discussion on Monday to discuss how stories about terrorism are portrayed unequally in the media. For example, the Charlie Hebdo attack dominated the media, while 2,000 people killed by terrorists in Nigeria at the same time didn’t make the news cycle. The panel provided a riveting, inside look at challenges and dangers of delivering information from dangerous areas while looking for an audience.

3. Threats and opportunities of increasing isolationism to international power relations

At a plenary discussion on Tuesday, a panel of prominent journalists and academics discussed the trend of isolationism, especially with Donald Trump’s “America First” politics. One speaker discussed the danger of the US losing soft power on the world stage and being ignored internationally. The panel provided a preview of a future that looks a lot different than today.

4. Lie Detectors

The final day of the Global Media Forum was devoted to media innovation. As part of the Innovation Lab day, DW Akademie invited the media competence organization Lie Detectors, which goes to schools and teaches children media literacy and how to spot fake news stories from real reporting. As online news and social media are the primary sources for a new generation of media users, this service will become even more valuable.

Date

2018-06-20 | 7:04

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Market roundup: June 2018

Europe

Zapovednik, DW’s Russian-language, animated political satire, is resonating with Russian audiences and is one of the most viewed videos on DW’s Russian partner website Ekho Moskvy. The 12-minute episodes tackle current political issues and put a funny and entertaining spin on important topics. By using animated satire, DW can convey an alternative perspective in the Russian media landscape. DW’s partner Ekho Moskvy is a reliable source of independent news in Russia.

Asia

DW’s English channel is once again available on the leading Malaysian Pay TV provider ASTRO. Around 1 million subscribers can now access DW on the providers OTT platform Astro Go.

The Vietnamese cable provider HTV-TMS in Ho Chi Minh City is providing DW’s English channel to 600,000 subscribers.

DW’s partner in Thailand PSI is broadcasting Tomorrow Today, Global 3000, Drive It, In Good Shape and Euromaxx to an estimated 18 million households.

Date

2018-06-08 | 12:21

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