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It all started in Rwanda…

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This year, DW Akademie is celebrating its 50th anniversary. It’s an institution that has grown immensely since that first training program for radio technicians in Rwanda. It has steadily expanded its work promoting press freedom, freedom of expression and media development. But the game has changed over the past five decades. Information can now reach every corner of the world, which is why media development has taken center stage in development policy. DW Akademiie is meeting these challenges with an innovative and interdisciplinary approach. They work on political frameworks in consultation with government authorities and NGOs, for example, and advise journalists and the media on developing new business models to assure their financial independence. Today, DW Akademie works in 50 countries around the world, with sustainably designed programs and clearly defined aims.

Date

2015-11-13 | 10:38

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A global look at Berlin

A new joint-project from DW, RBB and Berlin Producers is proving just how small the world is. Worldwide Berlin is hoping to create a connection to the more than 80 different Berlins that exist around the globe. Along with a four-part documentary airing in January, viewers can already dive into more than 100 Berlins on an interactive world map – each more colorful and curious than the last. It turns the world into a village, effortlessly eating up kilometers, climates and time zones.

Worldwide Berlin is a global interactive web documentary in the making. It is also the most comprehensive collection of stories from over 100 places worldwide called Berlin. If you want to find out how such a global, grassroots project got started – just take a look at the “making of” segments on the blog.

Date

2014-11-28 | 10:15

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Weaving individual stories to create a unique viewing experience

Guest commentary

Fabian von der Mark, Senior Producer for Life Links

In the multimedia age, good television programming will succeed by standing out from the content overload that is constantly bombarding audiences. People may expect something different from TV journalism than they did ten years ago but they still pay attention to stories that reach them personally with dynamism, insight and perspective.

There is no precise formula for creating original television, but good storytelling and a compelling protagonist are fundamental elements that will always connect with audiences. Everything starts with reporters in the field. For our new multimedia series, Life Links, we have put together a diverse team of young journalists and are sending them around the world to meet young people and listen to them talk about the issues that are holding them back.

We start with a core concept for each episode, but it comes down to the creativity and insight of our reporters to tie the essential elements together and find the story behind the story. The process is unscripted and nothing is guaranteed, but we are not looking for predictable answers. We are trying to share the stories of a generation with real people who tell it like it is, not like we think it should be.

If you look closely, you will see that the young people who share their stories with us may come from many different places – but they also have many things in common. We have interviewed North Korean defectors, Roma in Paris or Bolivian coca farmers and we work together as a team to take these individual stories and weave them together to create a single voice that speaks clearly about universal problems. The depth of experience and the international environment at DW makes it the perfect atmosphere to bring these stories to life.

As the series takes off we will explore how issues like identity, drug use and family problems affect individuals in different ways. Through telling these stories on television and by heavily incorporating online multimedia, we can create a global narrative and begin conversations with which young people everywhere can share their realities. The result are documentaries that stand out and speak out.

The obstacles every young person faces are as diverse as the dreams they are trying to realize. I believe the stories shared on Life Links will ultimately show us that sometimes what holds you back can also be what drives you forwards.


Date

2014-10-14 | 10:40

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Making culture count in Brazil with the new series Camarote.21

Camarote.21 – DW’s new series in Portuguese for Brazil – will debut this weekend on Rede Minas. It features the latest events and trends from the world of European music, literature, art and film and will be shown every Sunday.

Brazilian born host, Francis França is excited by the possibility to convey German and European culture to a Brazilian audience. “Culture offers a wide range of possibilities to convey and transport information,” she said, “culture has many expressive forms and is not necessarily limited by language.” She hopes the show will help connect Brazil and Germany and foster understanding and an intercultural dialogue. França  also frequently invites Brazilian artists into the studio who are either currently based in or travelling through Germany.

Camarote.21 builds on DW’s Portuguese language programming in Brazil. On October 1o the Brazilian educational broadcaster Canal Futura began broadcasting the successful science magazine Futurando. The channel can be received by a potential audience of 94 million nationwide.

Date

2013-10-25 | 5:46

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Spanish, German and PopXport are all getting more air time

Starting September 30, audiences in Asia and Latin America will be able to enjoy an expanded DW television lineup in Spanish and German. DW (Latinoamerica) will be increasing its Spanish language programming from 20 to 24 hours a day and DW (Asien) will also feature a full 24 hours of German language programming. The change is a part of a strategy to provide programming that it suited to the demands of different global markets. The success of DW’s Spanish programming in Latin America has dictated the change to a full 24-hour program. In Asia, DW already offers 24 hours of English language programming on its flagship channel. Increasing DW (Asien) programming to 24 hours in German will make DW the go-to channel for a complete selection of German language television in Asian markets.

But that’s not all, PopXport, DW’s trendy music magazine featuring all the best music and bands from Germany, will now be aired once every week.

Date

2013-09-27 | 11:21

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