More DW Blogs DW.COM

Search Results for Tag: dance

Dancing to keep women safe

Melisa Rodrigues, a 27-year-old from Lisbon, used to work for a big international company. At some point she realized, money wasn’t the key to happiness. So she quit her job, did a Master’s degree in globalization and development and went to India to work for an NGO.

It was in India that she learned about the One Billion Rising movement – an annual dance event demanding an end to violence against women and girls all over the world.

Melisa realized that violence – particularly domestic violence – was a big problem in her home country, Portugal. So she organized a One Billion Rising event in a train station in Lisbon to raise awareness and help women affected by violence know they’re not alone.

Listen to the report by Nádia Dinis in Lisbon:

 

Melisa Rodrigues is practicing her dance moves for the One Billion Rising event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

Melisa Rodrigues is practicing her dance moves for the One Billion Rising event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

The Lisbon event drew a strong crowd of mainly woman - and a few men (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

The Lisbon event drew a strong crowd of mainly woman – and a few men (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

Melisa (right) is pictured with Rita, another volunteer, at the Portuguese parliament just before the One Billion Rising event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

Melisa (right) is pictured with Rita, another volunteer, at the Portuguese parliament just before the One Billion Rising event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

A former Portuguese football player hosted the event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

A former Portuguese football player hosted the event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

 

 

Date

Tuesday 04.03.2014 | 15:48

Share

Feedback

Write a Comment

Changing lives through dance in Kenya

Dance can changes lives. This is the philosophy of volunteer Amrei Krings. One-and-a-half years ago, she started planning a dance workshop to empower sex workers in Kenya and founded the organization Maua in order to realize her idea.

This summer, her dream became a reality. While the dance workshop was a success, the project wasn’t easy for Amrei, who had to learn some tough lessons about trust and cultural differences.

Listen to the report by Falk Steinborn in Naivasha, Kenya:

Changing lives through dance in Kenya

Visit Amrei’s organization, Maua, on Facebook.

 

Amrei Krings

Amrei Krings was responsible for everything behind the scenes, so didn’t have much time left to dance herself (Photo: Falk Steinborn)

Maua dancers

Dance instructor Charles practices with the women and a group of young men that came twice to help out. On Fridays the workshop was open to everybody in Naivasha in order to integrate the sex workers into the community of the villagers. (Photo: Falk Steinborn)

Maua meeting

Amrei has some stress with the partner organization on location (Photo: Falk Steinborn)

Maua dancers

The dancers are getting prepared for the final show (Photo: Falk Steinborn)

Amrei Krings

Amrei’s aim was to give the women a new sense of themselves (Photo: Falk Steinborn)

Maua participants

After the workshop in the morning, Amrei leads a meeting in the afternoon in order to prepare the final show (Photo: Falk Steinborn)

Benedetta Reuter

Dance teacher Benedetta Reuter gives some instructions to the women to make bigger and braver movements (Photo: Falk Steinborn)

 

Date

Tuesday 10.09.2013 | 13:14

Share

Feedback

Write a Comment

Dance for unity in Nigeria

In Nigeria, country with many languages and ethnic groups, Thomas believes that people shouldn’t be judged on their background. He’s now bringing thousands of young people together with a unique unity dance.

Listen to the report by Nonye Aghaji in Abuja, Nigeria:

Dance for unity in Nigeria

Thomas Eba coming out from performance

Thomas draws out the traditional elements of Nigera’s ethnic groups (Photo: N. Aghaji)

Thomas performing

Thomas in action (Photo: N. Aghaji)

Unity dancers

Thomas has brought the unity dance to thousands of young people in his community (Photo: N. Aghaji)

Date

Tuesday 30.07.2013 | 11:56

Share

Feedback

Write a Comment

Dance empowers Kenyan prostitutes

Two young Germans believe dance can change lives and are bringing a holistic dance program to prostitutes in Kenya with an organization called Maua. They not only want to restore the women’s self-confidence, but also meet their medical needs.

Maua co-founders Amrei Krings and Maren Haferkamp join Pulse hosts Kate Müser and Helen Whittle in the studio:

Dance empowers Kenyan prostitutes

 

A group of women, including sex workers, in Naivasha work on a water tank

Prostitutes in Naivasha offer themselves on the streets to workers in the flower industry

The dance workshop will take place in August 2013 in this church

Maua co-founders Maren Haferkamp and Amrei Krings joined DW in the studio

Visit Maua’s website for more information.

Follow Maua on Facebook.

Date

Tuesday 29.01.2013 | 14:30

Share

Feedback

Write a Comment

Ghanaian choreographer looks after street children

Jay, 28, is passionate about preserving traditional African dance – and about watching out for the street kids in the impoverished city of Accra. She and her husband Nii, a drummer, have founded a dancing troupe whose purpose is not only to spread West African dance theater but also to improve local children’s lives.

In James Town, a poor neighborhood of Accra, children are likely to wander around all day among garbage and open sewage and have little chance to go to school, since their families cannot afford to send them and to buy them what they need. Through their artistic performances abroad and their music and dance workshops in Accra, Jay and Nii were able to raise enough money to give 50 kids a safe place on the seaside where they can play and study without leaving their neighborhood and their families.

The center was opened in 2007 and, since then, they have built a shed for outdoor activities, a dormitory for kids who can stay with them during the academic year and a classroom. Within their means, they provide them with school uniforms, school supplies and books. Jay recently became a mother herself, and her baby girl is the 51st child she cares for.

Listen to the report by Gaia Manco:

Ghanaian choreographer looks after street children

Jay from JayNii in Ghana

Jay looks after 50 street children - plus her own child

Streetwise children during their free time after school

Streetwise children during their free time after school

Nii

Jay's husband Nii is religious and practical: "We don't pray God and wait: we pray, and we move."

In this picture, reporter Gaia Manco is filming with with her little helpers, some of the kids that live at the shelter. Among them is Steven, an 8-year-old boy that came toward her and my husband when they were walking on the beach of James Town. Despite being a beautiful spot in the oldest area of Accra, the beach is currently degraded – and used as a public toilet and a dump. Steven said with pride, “Come and see where I live.” Jay said she was so proud that a boy who could barely speak when they met him was able to politely address strangers in English. While all the rest of the kids fought to be in front of the camera, Steven stayed behind Gaia. He wants to become a director one day.

Gaia Manco in Ghana

The colorful shelter and the James Town lighthouse

The colorful shelter and the James Town lighthouse

Read more about Jay and Nii’s foundation here.

Date

Tuesday 19.06.2012 | 13:00

Share

Feedback

Write a Comment