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Dancing to keep women safe

Melisa Rodrigues, a 27-year-old from Lisbon, used to work for a big international company. At some point she realized, money wasn’t the key to happiness. So she quit her job, did a Master’s degree in globalization and development and went to India to work for an NGO.

It was in India that she learned about the One Billion Rising movement – an annual dance event demanding an end to violence against women and girls all over the world.

Melisa realized that violence – particularly domestic violence – was a big problem in her home country, Portugal. So she organized a One Billion Rising event in a train station in Lisbon to raise awareness and help women affected by violence know they’re not alone.

Listen to the report by Nádia Dinis in Lisbon:

 

Melisa Rodrigues is practicing her dance moves for the One Billion Rising event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

Melisa Rodrigues is practicing her dance moves for the One Billion Rising event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

The Lisbon event drew a strong crowd of mainly woman - and a few men (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

The Lisbon event drew a strong crowd of mainly woman – and a few men (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

Melisa (right) is pictured with Rita, another volunteer, at the Portuguese parliament just before the One Billion Rising event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

Melisa (right) is pictured with Rita, another volunteer, at the Portuguese parliament just before the One Billion Rising event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

A former Portuguese football player hosted the event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

A former Portuguese football player hosted the event (Photo: Miguel Fascinado)

 

 

Date

Tuesday 04.03.2014 | 15:48

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Human rights in Rwanda and Bosnia: Call for applications from Global Youth Connect

Global Youth Connect is now accepting applications for its summer human rights programs in Rwanda and Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Application Deadline:

Feb 15, 2014

Here’s more from the organization:

Dear Colleagues, Friends, and Future Participants:

We wanted to remind you that Global Youth Connect is now accepting applications for our Summer 2014 Human Rights Programs in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Rwanda.

Each program will bring visiting youth (from the US, Canada, the UK, Australia, and all around the world) together with youth in the host location to engage together in three key activities:

  • A cross cultural human rights workshop
  • Visits/meetings with policy makers, organizations, and to relevant sites
  • Volunteer service with grassroots NGOs on a variety of human rights issues including but not limited to: conflict resolution, education, health care, food/shelter, access to justice, human rights of children/youth, women, low-income populations, LGBTQ populations, indigenous populations, genocide survivors.

The deadline for applications is February 15, 2014.

Ages 18 – 30 (for Bosnia Programs) and 18 – 35 (for Rwanda Program).

Anyone can apply! From the US, Canada, and all over the world.

So please forward widely, share on Facebook, or help promote by putting up this GYC 2014 Summer Programs Poster.

Note: Program fees quoted are for visiting participants (not for local Rwandan or Bosnian participants). Some tuition reduction scholarship assistance is available for each program. See individual application documents for more information about tuition reduction scholarships.

To apply, click here.

For testimonials, click here.

For previous Rwanda reports, click here.

For previous Bosnia reports, click here.

GYC Blogs: gycvillage.org and the Open Society’s youthpolicy.org/interculturalblogging

Date

Wednesday 12.02.2014 | 13:18

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Young man stands up for women’s rights in Buenos Aires

In Buenos Aires, it’s not uncommon to see ads plastered on every street corner featuring scantily clad women in lascivious positions. The prostitutes for sale, however, are often there against their will. Human trafficking in the sex industry is a major problem.

Jerónimo Velez is working to change that, together with the organization Martes Rojos. He leads volunteers on walks through the city to remove the sex ads. Their aim? To raise awareness for the fact that many of the city’s prostitutes are victims of trafficking.

For some people in the community, it’s unusual that a man like Jerónimo would have the courage to take a stand on this sensitive issue.

Listen to the report by Maria Cruz from Buenos Aires:

Jerónimo Velez

Jerónimo emphasizes that Martes Rojos is non-political (Photo: M. Cruz)

Flyers advertising prostitutes are ubiquitous in Buenos Aires (Photo: M. Cruz)

Flyers advertising prostitutes are ubiquitous in Buenos Aires (Photo: M. Cruz)

Martes Rojos volunteers take to the streets regularly to remove sex ads (Photo: Martes Rojos)

Martes Rojos volunteers take to the streets regularly to remove sex ads (Photo: Martes Rojos)

Reporter Maria Cruz joined in on one of the Martes Rojos walks (Photo: Martes Rojos)

Reporter Maria Cruz joined in on one of the Martes Rojos walks (Photo: Martes Rojos)

 

Date

Wednesday 18.12.2013 | 07:55

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Keeping women safe in Cambodia

In Cambodia, violence against women is a troubling – and common – concern. Ou Ratanak, witnessed it first-hand when he was growing up. He says his uncle physically abused his aunt, but when he brought it up, he was told to mind his own business.

Now, however, he’s making women’s safety his business. And he’s hoping to tackle the problem for future generations, by heading an organization that works with young adults to change attitudes towards sexual violence.

Listen to the report by Irwin Loy in Phnom Penh, Cambodia:

Keeping women safe in Cambodia

 

Ou Ratanak looks on as a student makes a point during a mock debate held to encourage critical thinking on gender issues among Cambodian youth

Ou Ratanak looks on as a student makes a point during a mock debate held to encourage critical thinking on gender issues among Cambodian youth (Photo: I. Loy)

A student makes his case during a mock debate held to encourage critical thinking on gender issues among Cambodian youth

A student makes his case during a mock debate held to encourage critical thinking on gender issues among Cambodian youth (Photo: I. Loy)

Students discuss gender issues during a mock debate held to encourage critical thinking issues among Cambodian youth

Raising awareness is Ou Ratanak’s first priority (Photo: I. Loy)

Date

Tuesday 13.08.2013 | 11:55

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The Storytellers

DW presents a brand new series! Our correspondents profile local leaders, activists, artists, musicians, rich and poor, ordinary and extraordinary people from around the globe, whose lives tell us more about the world we live in.

Check out the first inspiring story to find out why this Kurdish mayor has been stripped of office and faces scores of court cases.

Jail is ‘occupational hazard’ for Kurdish mayor

Abdullah Demirbas

Abdullah Demirbas wants to preserve cultural identity

Date

Wednesday 16.01.2013 | 12:24

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Singer raises his voice in Myanmar

Darko and his indie rock band Side Effect are singing for change in Myanmar. Despite looser censorship laws, he doesn’t feel totally free. But the band’s first-ever tour abroad has given them courage to continue.

Listen to the report by Nadine Wojcik in Berlin:

Singer raises his voice in Myanmar

 

Darko

Many of Darko’s songs are full of harsh realism

Darko and Side Effect in Berlin

Side Effect was overwhelmed with the response they got in Berlin

Darko and Tse with tattoo

Darko und drummer Tser Htoo have matching tattoos of the band’s logo

 

Read more about Side Effect in the DW article.

Date

Tuesday 15.01.2013 | 13:36

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Bahraini crosses class borders to help torture victims

As an upper-class Shia Muslim, Jihan Kazerooni was far removed from Bahrain’s Arab Spring revolution. But when she learned of human rights abuses in her country, she founded a rehabilitation group for torture victims.

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting provided a grant for Reese Erlich’s coverage of Bahrain. Listen to the report by Reese Ehrlich from Manama, Bahrain:

Bahraini crosses class borders to help torture victims

 

Jihan Kazerooni

Jihan Kazerooni ignores social and religious divides

Date

Tuesday 08.01.2013 | 12:40

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Campaigning for the rights of Uganda’s LGBT community

“Call me Kuchu” is a film about the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender – or LGBT – community in Uganda. It is a feature film by two 28-year-old filmmakers Katherine Fairfax-Wright and Malika Zouhali-Worrall and has already won several awards around the world.

Listen to the report by Chiponda Chimbelu:

Listen to the report:

A scene from the documentray film “Call me Kuchu”

Date

Wednesday 07.11.2012 | 08:16

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The challenges of freedom of expression

Freedom of speech and expression continue to spark debates around the globe: from the release of WikiLeaks files, to caricatures of the prophet Muhammad, and from staging a rock concert in a church to publishing news about minorities. Wherever the issue emerges, it’s often controversial and it often involves the media.

DW examines the background of the various contexts in which freedom of speech and expression is both fought for and restricted.

Check out all the content here.

Date

Thursday 20.09.2012 | 09:15

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North Korean defector works toward democracy

Emma, 18, managed to flee North Korea with her mother. Now she’s networking with other young political activists with hopes of eventually developing democracy in her home country.

Listen to the report by Roberto Tofani, presented by André Leslie:

North Korean defector works toward democracy

Here are some organizations that promote democracy in North Korea:

Citizens’ Alliance for North Korean Human Rights
Ydank (in Korean)
The National Democratic Institute

Date

Tuesday 08.05.2012 | 13:07

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